City of Stirling Strategic Community Plan - Sustainable Stirling

Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 Strategic Community Plan

Acknowledgement of Country

Ngalak kaadatj Nyoongar nedingar wer birdiya, baalap barn boodja-k wer kaaratj boodja-k koora koora wer yeyi.

Ngalak kaadatj baalabang malayin wer nakolak baalap yang ngalany-al City of Stirling dandjoo Nyoongar moort-al kolbang koorliny. City of Stirling kaadatj Nyoongar moort Nyoongar boodja-k Wadjak boodja-k, Mooro boodja-k. The City of Stirling acknowledges the Wadjak People of the Nyoongar Nation as the traditional custodians of Mooro Country. We pay our respects to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders past and present for they hold the memories, the traditions, the culture and hopes of Aboriginal Australia. The City is committed to forging stronger relationships and a deeper respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. By acknowledging and respecting the diversity and history of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, we will continue to realise our vision for reconciliation.

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A symbol for the City of Stirling

The stunning statue of Lina stands 10 metres tall at the entrance of the City of Stirling Administration Centre. Lina has simple references to gardening, industry, time and community and has come to be recognised as a symbol for the City, ushering and directing the community in their engagement with the Council. The name Lina is derived from the artists' memories of an Italian woman who lived locally and worked for his father during the 1950s and 1960s. The memories of Lina are of a generous, cheerful and helpful woman who gave an insight into another culture and life.

Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

Contents

Message from the Mayor About the City of Stirling

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Council

10 11 12 14 16 17 18 21 22 24 28 32 36 42

Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework

About Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

Our stakeholders Community input Emerging priorities

Our commitment to sustainability

Our vision

Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 at a glance

Key result area: Our Community

Key result area: Our Economy

Key result area: Our Built Environment

Key result area: Our Natural Environment

Key result area: Our Leadership Federal and State Government: Key strategies and plans

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Message from the Mayor

There is so much to love about the City of Stirling. Our close proximity to the Perth CBD, vibrant cultural and entertainment precincts, pristine coastline and natural areas and an enviable lifestyle make this a place of opportunity.

So what do we want the City of Stirling to be in ten years and beyond? Every local government in Western Australia is required to have a strategic community plan. It is our highest-level planning document that sets out a long-term vision for the future. In 2021/22 we conducted a major review of this plan. We reached out far and wide to find out what our community wants to see in the years ahead and we found that there are many important things we agree are our priorities. Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 outlines an achievable and ambitious vision that is powered by this feedback. It is the driving force behind all of the projects, programs and services that the City provides and signals our commitment to the community and cements our enviable track record of delivery in the sector. Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 includes all of the elements that we need to create a sustainable future. Set out across five key result areas we clearly and concisely articulate our priorities, outlining what we aim to achieve, how we will achieve them and how we will measure our success against this plan. These key result areas are integral to the future of the City of Stirling, reflecting the aspirations and values of our community and our positive contribution towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

I would like to thank the members of our community that have contributed to the development of Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032. Our extensive community consultation saw more than 2,000 people collaborate at events, in kiosks at shopping centres, displays in libraries and leisure centres and through an online survey. The City of Stirling cannot deliver this alone. Working with our community and stakeholders to listen and continue the conversations to understand the priorities moving forward will be the key to our success. Every one of us has a role to play in realising our shared future to make this a better place for everyone. Together we can create a sustainable City with a local focus and be the City of Stirling – the City of Choice.

Mark Irwin Mayor

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

ABOUT THE CITY OF STIRLING

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

ABOUT THE CITY OF STIRLING

About the City of Stirling The City of Stirling (the City) is located 8km north of Perth’s central business district and covers an area of around 100km 2 . Spanning 30 suburbs – from Scarborough in the west to Balga and Inglewood in the east, and from Beach Road in the north to Herdsman in the south – the City is a thriving cosmopolitan, multicultural and economic hub.

It is the largest local government area by population in Western Australia and the seventeenth largest in Australia. The City’s estimated resident population in 2021 was 223,260, with a median age of 37 years. Between 2016 and 2020, the annualised population growth rate was 0.41 per cent. The City of Stirling’s population is incredibly diverse. Recent data from 2021 shows that around 37 per cent of the City’s population was born overseas and about 29 per cent of the population spoke a language other than English at home. The population of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders has remained stable at approximately one per cent of the City’s population. The City is mainly urban, with over 103,000 private dwellings that includes a diverse range of housing types. It also has 1,780ha of open space for reserves, parks, natural conservation areas and special purpose lands, including over 700ha of natural bushland, 26 wetland sites and 6.5km of coastal dunes and beaches.

The popular summer playgrounds and top surf spots of Scarborough and Trigg are just some of the City’s major attractions. In 2021, the tourism industry contributed an estimated $401 million to the local economy while employing around 1,678 people. However, since 2020 the COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted the City’s tourism sector output and related employment. With well-established business and retail centres, the City of Stirling is the second-largest employment district in Western Australia, after the Perth central business district. Approximately 80,350 people work in the City of Stirling within key industries including construction, retail, health, professional, scientific and technical, education and training, manufacturing, hospitality, and real estate services. The total value of final goods and services generated by the City of Stirling economy in 2021 was estimated at $17.56 billion.

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Council With over 223,000 residents, the City of Stirling is the largest local government in Western Australia by population. The City is divided into seven wards, each represented by two Elected Members. The City of Stirling has 14 Councillors and a popularly elected Mayor.

Mayor Mark Irwin

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Yanchep

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Perth

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CM

Ocean Indian

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Perth

CMY

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Fremantle

Doubleview Ward

Balga Ward

Coastal Ward

Hamersley Ward

Lawley Ward

Osborne Ward

Inglewood Ward

Deputy Mayor Cr Stephanie Proud JP

Cr Andrea Creado

Cr Felicity Farrelly

Cr Chris Hatton

Cr Joe Ferrante

Cr Lisa Thornton

Bianca Sandri

Cr Elizabeth Re

Cr Keith Sargent

Cr Tony Krsticevic

Cr Karlo Perkov

Cr Suzanne Migdale

Cr Theresa Olow

Cr David Lagan

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

ABOUT THE CITY OF STIRLING

Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework

In 2011, the Western Australian State Government introduced legislation requiring local governments to prepare an Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework. The framework requires the development of a ‘Plan for the Future’, comprising a 10-year Strategic Community Plan, a four-year Corporate Business Plan and supporting resource plans.

As part of the integrated planning process, local governments are required to consult with their communities to develop a long-term vision; examine the demographic, social, environmental and economic trends shaping the future of their area; and align their activities and resources to address the community’s aspirations expressed in the vision. Under the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework, it is required that local governments measure, assess and report their performances every year to their community. The measurement and reporting

process facilitates continuous improvement of local governments’ performance and progress towards the City’s vision and objectives. The diagram below illustrates the City of Stirling’s Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework. In 2021/22, the City of Stirling conducted a major review of the Strategic Community Plan. Feedback from the community has been incorporated into Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032. New baseline measures have been developed within the revised plan, against which the City’s performance in future years will be measured.

Plans for the future

Measuring performance

Informing strategies

Strategic Community Plan (10-year plan) Vision Mission Values and sustainability principles

Long-Term Financial Plan Asset Management Framework Workforce Plan Local Planning Strategy Risk Management Framework Strategic Information Management Plan

Community outcomes

Objectives Strategies

Corporate Business Plan (4-year plan) City services City projects and programs

City performance

Annual service plans (1-year plan) Operational service, projects and programs activities

Service delivery Project delivery Program delivery

Annual budget Annual plans

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About Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 sets out an ambitious and achievable vision for the development of the City over the next 10 years and beyond. This Plan:

• Establishes the City’s vision for the local government’s future, including aspirations and service expectations • Elaborates on how to achieve the City’s vision by clearly defining key result areas, objectives and strategies, along with measures of progress • Describes the City’s commitments. The Integrated Planning and Reporting Advisory Standard requires the Strategic Community Plan to be developed or modified through engagement with the community. Accordingly, the City’s first Strategic Community Plan was adopted in 2013 after extensive community consultation. The plan was also informed by a study of the demographic, social, environmental and economic trends in the City of Stirling, metropolitan Perth, Western Australia and beyond. In 2021/22, the City of Stirling conducted a major review of its Strategic Community Plan by

considering residents’ priorities and analysing trends and drivers impacting the City. In total, over 2,000 community members provided input. Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032: • Provides an overview of emerging priorities following the major review • Describes the 10-year vision for the future and the City’s mission, values and commitment to sustainable integrated planning, measurement and reporting • Identifies some of the key State and Federal plans and policies that will shape the City’s future. Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 encapsulates the community’s aspirations and meets all legislative requirements. It will continue to drive improvements in the City’s community engagement, service performance and sustainable outcomes so that it achieves the community’s vision for the City of Stirling to be the ‘City of Choice’.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

ABOUT THE CITY OF STIRLING

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Our stakeholders The City has a rich diversity of stakeholders who regularly participate in and contribute to how decisions are made. Forming strong relationships with these stakeholders means the City can always ensure that projects, services and initiatives are reflecting the needs and aspirations of the community they represent.

Clubs and community interest groups

Ratepayers and residents

Elected Members

Why are they important to us? As our captive audience, we owe it to our ratepayers and residents to include them in decisions that affect their daily lives.

These groups provide us with insight into what is important to local residents and members.

Elected by the community, they are the City’s decision makers and provide us with valuable feedback on local issues of importance.

What is the desired engagement outcome? To ensure that our community has an opportunity to have their say in a variety of ways and that they are kept informed about important milestones. How will we know if we are successful? They are more engaged and our customer service satisfaction levels increase.

To work with Elected Members to deliver good community outcomes to benefit all stakeholders.

To listen to group members, take on feedback and adjust our approach, if necessary, to reach a mutually agreed outcome.

There is more alignment between recommendations from employees and Council decisions.

We provide multiple opportunities to engage with clubs and interest groups and incorporate their wishes where possible.

Industry associations and peak bodies

Special inclusion groups

Town Teams

Why are they important to us? These groups are a valued voice of the groups who need us to think big and think inclusively.

Town Teams are our ‘eyes on the street’ in town centres and can help deliver City-supported, micro initiatives.

These organisations provide valuable feedback on industry needs and trends to help us help the industries they represent.

What is the desired engagement outcome? To ensure we are including all parts of our community in both the engagement process and final project outcomes. How will we know if we are successful? Our projects and initiatives proactively adhere to inclusive principles.

To empower and build capacity within our Town Teams to deliver initiatives that will support town centres.

To use their feedback to inform and shape how we deliver initiatives that will impact various industries.

Town Teams deliver more initiatives and/ or more Town Teams are created.

We build a culture of collegiality with these industry bodies and utilise their expertise strategically and on specific projects.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

ABOUT THE CITY OF STIRLING

We use targeted methods to ensure that our stakeholders are engaged, have the information they need to contribute to the discussion and know what the outcome is, without having to ask. We have identified our key stakeholders and why we are important to each other.

Government

Businesses

Visitors

Why are they important to us? Our community expects us to work collaboratively with other agencies to ensure seamless delivery of joint projects.

Stirling businesses are the engine room of our local economy and create local jobs, so we need them to thrive.

Visitors are significant contributors to our economy and the vibrancy of our places so we want to be their destination of choice.

What is the desired engagement outcome? To extend support for our community by partnering with government agencies on project initiatives and funding opportunities. How will we know if we are successful? Projects are delivered on time and on budget.

To capture feedback from visitors so we can continually improve the way in which our places and projects attract visitors.

To ensure businesses are set up for success by communicating with them about projects that may impact them.

We establish multiple ways in which we communicate with our businesses both strategically and on short notice.

We get more visitors to our places for longer.

City employees

Service providers

Media

Why are they important to us? A mix of technical specialists is required to balance a number of complex influences when planning and delivering projects.

These providers offer services to our community that the City does not provide directly.

The media plays a role in shaping our story to the community.

What is the desired engagement outcome? To work as a team and provide efficient, multi-layered customer service and project-based solutions. How will we know if we are successful? Projects are delivered with a focus on customer service and outcomes.

To maintain a strong relationship to ensure their presence in and impact on residents is maximised.

To ensure the media has all the information it needs to report a fair and balanced story on initiatives that will impact and benefit the community.

We receive more positive media coverage than negative.

Service providers are thriving and able to make a strong case for further funding from government agencies, including the City.

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Community input In accordance with the Integrated Planning and Reporting Advisory Guidelines (2016), the City of Stirling undertook a major review of its Strategic Community Plan in 2021/22. Extensive community consultation was conducted as part of this exercise.

The City advertised the consultation process through: • City of Stirling website with a dedicated Future City/Your Say page • Social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter • The City’s e-newsletter, Stirling Scene • Media release to promote community consultation • Emails to residents, Elected Members and City employees • Posters and flyers distributed to all City libraries and leisure centres. The City engaged with a diverse range of stakeholders during October and November 2021, with over 2,000 people actively consulted.

Community members provided their feedback using various channels such as: • Online surveys • Direct interactions with City’s representatives at: → Pop-up kiosks at shopping centres in Balcatta, Innaloo, Mirrabooka, Stirling and Yokine → Nine community events including Inglewood Night Markets, Scarborough Sunset Markets and Stirling Farmers’ Markets • Feedback postcards • Interactive display boards at City libraries and leisure centres • Workshops with Elected Members and City employees.

What people love about Stirling

Strong leader

Approachable staff

Amazing beaches

Safe neighbourhoods

Skateparks and BMX tracks

Libraries

Lovely trees and natural areas

Scarborough precinct

Farmers markets

Support for small business

Vibrant centres

Well maintained streets and parks

Fun community events

Great shopping centres

Local cafes

Cultural diversity

Community gardens

Wide roads

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

ABOUT THE CITY OF STIRLING

Emerging priorities During the recent major review of the Strategic Community Plan, the City listened to what the community and the key stakeholders had to say. Based on the feedback, two key emerging priorities have been identified which will shape the direction of the City over the next 10 years.

Environmental sustainability

There is an expectation within the community that the City should increase its efforts to create a more sustainable future. Strong feedback across all areas of the City of Stirling shows that people want to be more involved and would like the City to provide leadership and direction. Following the challenges over the past two years, appreciation for the natural environment and public open space in local communities has increased. It is very important to our community that this is protected and enhanced in years to come. The impacts of COVID-19 have changed the way people live, work and recreate in the City of Stirling. More people are working from home and spending more time in the local areas they live in. People want to be able to have access to their daily needs within walking distance from their homes. These include local services, small shopping and entertainment precincts and well-maintained, safe local open spaces. They want these places to reflect the unique character of their local area and to have better social connections to their neighbours.

Connection to local areas

As these priorities were so clear and important to our community, the City of Stirling has made a change to its overall vision for the first time since 2013 (see page 21). New strategic objectives and strategies have also been developed to address these priorities and are included in Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032.

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Our commitment to sustainability

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals In 2015, Australia was one of 193 countries throughout the world to commit to enacting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. At its heart are 17 Global Goals to address the social, economic and environmental elements of sustainable development, which provide a roadmap towards a better world for current and future generations.

Implementation of the goals is not only the role of local governments. Other levels of government, businesses and our local community all have a role. Working together on collaborative action will ensure a greater focus and positive contribution towards sustainability. Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 is a plan to achieve the goals relevant to our City and our community, as part of this wider global effort.

The City of Stirling has identified an initial set of indicators within Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 that align to these Sustainable Development Goals. These will help us focus our efforts on the areas where we can have the most impact. We will use these indicators to track our performance, learn from others and measure our success over the life of this Plan so that the City of Stirling can work together with our community to make a positive contribution towards Australia’s global commitment.

Source: The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

ABOUT THE CITY OF STIRLING

Sustainable planning and reporting Over the past eight years, the City of Stirling has become more actively committed to developing and improving its Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework to achieve more sustainable outcomes. The City advocates the importance of taking a long-term outlook in addition to a short-term view when making decisions and taking action. This is required by the State Government and is reflected in our long-term 10-year Strategic Community Plan and shorter-term four-year Corporate Business Plan.

Sustainability emphasises the need to consider, in an integrated way, the wider economic, social and environmental implications of decisions and actions for the community. The sustainability agenda has more recently been expanded to consider a fourth element of a sustainable city. Known as ‘governance’ or ‘ethical responsibility’, this component reflects the principles, values and standards of an organisation. These four pillars of sustainability are broadly known as the ‘quadruple bottom line’.

At the City of Stirling, we have developed Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 using the four pillars of sustainability in the quadruple bottom line to drive this approach through all aspects of our planning and delivery. These have become the key result areas in this plan, with the ‘environment’ pillar split into ‘built environment’ and ‘natural environment’ to enhance our focus in these areas. Planning and reporting within this framework enables us to simultaneously let our community know what the priorities are and what sustainable outcomes are being achieved over the life of Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032.

Quadruple bottom line

Social

Economic

Environment

Governance

Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

Our Built Environment

Our Natural Environment

Our Economy

Our Community

Our Leadership

Key result areas

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR VISION

Our vision A sustainable City with a local focus.

Our mission To serve our

community by delivering efficient, responsive and sustainable services.

Our values Approachable Responsive Transparent Innovative

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 at a glance Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032 incorporates feedback from the community and outlines a vision, mission and direction for the next 10 years. This is further described by five key result areas, which give direction to our commitment to achieve this vision.

An inclusive and harmonious City

An active and healthy City

Each key result area has outcomes, objectives and strategies that outline what the City aims to achieve and how the City will achieve it. New baseline measures have been developed to sit alongside the new objectives and strategies. The City’s success and performance in future years will be measured against these.

Our Community

A safer City

A smart and prosperous City

Our Economy

A local business City

A vibrant City

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR VISION

An accessible and connected City

A liveable City

An attractive and well-maintained City

Our Built Environment

An energy-smart City

Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

A biodiverse City

Our Natural Environment

A sustainable City with a local focus

A water-wise City

A waste-wise City

Our Leadership

A well-governed City

A customer-focused City

A capable and efficient City

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Key result area

Our Community

An inclusive and harmonious City

An active and healthy City

A safer City

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR COMMUNITY

Objective: Connect communities with their local areas With an extremely diverse population, it is important that the City supports and encourages our residents to be part of their local communities. We are respectful of all cultures and embrace diversity and equal opportunity. We will create welcoming places and provide opportunities to bring people together so that they feel included and have a variety of ways to participate in community life.

An inclusive and harmonious City

How will we achieve this? • Facilitate social connections and access to services locally • Build strong relationships with our multicultural and diverse community • Encourage active participation and volunteering • Enable opportunities for lifelong learning.

How will we measure our progress? • Participation numbers for programs and activities offered by the City • Community perception of the City’s focus on and support for diverse groups • Participation numbers for volunteering opportunities offered by the City • Community satisfaction with services for the elderly, families and youth • Community satisfaction with the City’s library services • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services Aged Care Services, Community Development, Family Services, Libraries & Lifelong Learning, Multicultural Engagement, Youth & Children Development.

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An active and healthy City

Objective: Promote active and healthy lifestyle choices Healthy and active people create strong and resilient communities. The City will ensure that our community, through all stages of life, has access to a range of opportunities to support an active lifestyle. We will build partnerships and advocate with others to make sure our community has access to services that improve health and wellbeing outcomes for all. How will we achieve this? • Facilitate a range of recreation and leisure opportunities for everyone in the City • Facilitate and advocate for the provision of a range of quality health services. How will we measure our progress? • Community satisfaction with the City’s sports and leisure facilities • Usage and member retention rates for the City’s sports and leisure facilities • Community satisfaction with the City’s beaches • Community satisfaction with access to health and care services within the City • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs. Associated City services Environmental Health, Leisure Services, Open Space & Parks Development, Recreation Facilities.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR COMMUNITY

Objective: Work with the community to create a safer City We understand that feeling safe is a high priority for our community. We will play a key role in creating a safer community through our dedicated, visible and responsive ranger and security services. We will also proactively engage, educate and encourage members of our community and other agencies to help to prevent crime and anti-social behaviour to create a safer City.

A safer City

How will we achieve this? • Educate our community and provide support to enhance community safety • Create strong partnerships to improve community safety.

How will we measure our progress? • Participation numbers for community safety-focused events held by the City • Community satisfaction with the City’s ranger services • Community satisfaction with the City’s security patrols • Community satisfaction with the City’s graffiti management • Community satisfaction with the City’s management of public parking • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services Emergency Management, Parking Services, Ranger Services, Security Services, Swimming Pool Inspections.

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Key result area

Our Economy

A smart and prosperous City

A local business City

A vibrant City

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR ECONOMY

Objective: Encourage economic investment

The City is proud of its current economic profile and we will work hard to advocate and partner with key stakeholders to promote the City’s investment potential. The City will encourage economic investment to create a diverse mix of industries to attract and establish next generation jobs and businesses. Our planning frameworks will be used to support investment and urban regeneration.

A smart and prosperous City

How will we achieve this? • Attract and promote investment and partnership opportunities • Advocate, lobby and partner with stakeholders to benefit the community.

How will we measure our progress? • Value (AUD) of commercial building permits issued in the City • Community perception towards the City as a place to start or invest in a business • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services City Future Projects, Economic Development, Executive Services, Planning Services.

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Objective: Facilitate local business and employment growth With approximately 80,000 jobs across more than 22,000 businesses supporting the local economy, the City is the second-largest employment district in WA after the Perth central business district. To help our local industry grow and thrive, we will foster a business-friendly environment, encouraging competition and productivity. We will support an environment that allows our business community to flourish, embracing technology and creating job growth, so that it can propel our economy forward into the future.

A local business City

How will we achieve this? • Support innovation and entrepreneurship in local business • Make it easier to do business with the City.

How will we measure our progress? • Participation numbers for local business focused events held by the City • Local business satisfaction with interactions and support provided by the City • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services City Future Projects, Economic Development, Planning Services.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR ECONOMY

Objective: Attract visitors to our City

Local neighbourhood centres provide many opportunities where people can meet, shop, create, learn and work that help sustain the wellbeing of our residents and visitors. It is important that the City supports activity and events in these centres so that people can come together to take part in a vibrant community, civic and cultural life. The City of Stirling will showcase our unique tourist attractions and encourage tourism infrastructure development to generate activity and growth to support our economy.

A vibrant City

How will we achieve this? • Activate local centres to increase visitor and economic activity • Support the City’s cultural sector to create vibrancy in our local areas • Encourage and support tourism growth.

How will we measure our progress? • Attendance numbers and satisfaction levels for City events • Number of visitors that stay overnight within the City • Community satisfaction with the City’s community events and cultural activities • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services Arts & Events, Economic Development, Marketing & Communications.

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Key result area

Our Built Environment

An attractive and well-maintained City

An accessible and connected City

A liveable City

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Objective: Create unique and liveable neighbourhoods and places The City of Stirling is recognised for its tree-lined streets, well-planned neighbourhoods and a network of vibrant local centres. It will be important to balance new development and accommodate growth while maintaining the character and heritage of our local areas. We will plan to maintain the amenity of these local areas, ensuring that they are thriving and liveable with a diverse range of housing. We will strategically plan for growth in activity centres and corridors and support the ‘15-minute City’ concept to ensure our community has access to their daily needs close by.

A liveable City

How will we achieve this? • Prioritise growth in activity corridors and centres • Improve the quality, liveability and identity of local areas • Facilitate diverse housing choice for our community.

How will we measure our progress? • Community satisfaction with services and facilities in local neighbourhoods • City’s performance within regulatory building and planning timeframes • Community satisfaction with the local neighbourhood overall • Community satisfaction with the City’s heritage management • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services Building Services, City Future Projects, Planning Services, Schemes, Policies & Heritage, Swimming Pool Inspections, Verge & Crossover Services.

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An accessible and connected City

Objective: Connect the community through sustainable and integrated transport networks A well-connected City is a successful City – socially, environmentally and economically. As well as providing safe and accessible roads and parking, the City will have a network of cycleways and pathways to encourage residents and visitors to travel in more active and healthy ways. There will be a range of options for mobility, with improved public transport and integrated networks to enhance amenity and activity in local centres. How will we achieve this? • Provide and maintain safe and accessible roads and parking • Provide a safe network of cycleways and pathways to link people and places • Advocate for improved public transport options to enhance activity and reduce reliance on vehicle use. How will we measure our progress? • Community satisfaction with the City’s provision and maintenance of roads, pedestrian ways, cycleways and road safety measures • Community satisfaction with City’s provision of parking • Road safety results within the City • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services Construction Services, Design Services, Transport Services.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Objective: Ensure City assets meet current and future community needs With people choosing to spend more time close to home, our public open spaces and facilities are under increasing pressure as our community looks for local places to relax, connect and socialise. The City is proud to have a reputation for delivering exemplary open spaces and facilities for its community. To ensure that this continues, the City will deliver a comprehensive asset management process to provide quality, well-maintained facilities and open spaces that meet the needs of our current and future community.

An attractive and well-maintained City

How will we achieve this? • Provide quality, well-maintained facilities for the benefit of the community • Provide quality well-maintained sporting reserves, parks and open spaces for the community.

How will we measure our progress? • City’s performance against statutory asset-management-related measures • Community satisfaction with City’s community buildings, halls and toilets • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services Asset Management, Facility Management, Maintenance Services, Project Management, Property Services.

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Key result area

Our Natural Environment

An energy-smart City

A waste-wise City

A waterwise City

A biodiverse City

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

Objective: Transition to net zero emissions

Local government has a key role to play in contributing to national and international emissions reduction targets. In recognition of this, the City has set targets and a clear direction to reduce carbon emissions. We all have our part to play and the City will support our community and work with other levels of government to take action to reduce emissions and create a more sustainable future.

An energy-smart City

How will we achieve this? • Improve the City’s energy management and maximise energy efficiency • Increase the City’s generation, storage and use of renewable energy supplies • Support, engage and guide our community to transition to net zero emissions.

How will we measure our progress? • Progress and performance measures outlined in the City’s Sustainable Energy Action Plan (SEAP) • Community satisfaction with City initiatives and activities relating to the reduction of carbon emissions • Operational key performance indicators for directly associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services All City services.

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Objective: Ensure a sustainably managed water supply and a healthy and balanced urban water system Water is a valued and precious natural resource, and it is essential that the City finds ways to conserve and protect our water sources into the future. A drying climate and increased water demands continue to place pressure on our water sources. The City must find innovative ways to ensure our green areas and spaces continue to thrive without impacting our natural environment. We will ensure that water across the City is managed in a sustainable, equitable and resilient way so that our community and ecosystems can prosper into the future.

A water-wise City

How will we achieve this? • Maximise the City’s water efficiency and increase use of alternative water supplies • Improve water quality monitoring,

How will we measure our progress? • Progress against measures outlined in the City’s Waterwise Council Action Plan 2021–2026 • Operational key performance indicators for directly associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

stormwater management and reduction of water pollutants

• Support, engage and guide our community to conserve and protect water resources.

Associated City services All City services.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

Objective: Support biodiversity in our natural and urban environment with connected healthy ecosystems The City is fortunate to have a biodiverse natural environment with unique native flora and fauna. It is critical that we all conserve, protect and enhance these areas to ensure they exist for future generations. The City will plant and manage a diverse canopy of trees to cool our City, provide habitat for wildlife and create attractive, green streets and open spaces as our climate changes. We will also work with our community to increase our biodiversity and create a thriving and resilient urban ecology.

A biodiverse City

How will we achieve this? • Undertake conservation, protection and enhancement of natural ecosystems and biodiversity • Plan and adapt to climate change impacts • Increase tree planting and retention of trees across the City • Support, engage and guide our community to connect with nature and improve biodiversity across the City.

How will we measure our progress? • Track progress and performance measures outlined in the City’s Urban Forest Plan and Biodiversity Strategy • Community satisfaction with City initiatives and activities relating to environment • Operational key performance indicators for directly associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services City Trees, Conservation & Wildlife, Open Space & Parks Development, Parks & Streetscapes, Sustainability, Planning Services, Building Services, Verge & Crossover Services, Planning Projects, Schemes & Policies, Construction Services, Design Services, Maintenance Services, Project Management, Property Services.

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A waste-wise City

Objective: Support a low-waste, circular economy that

How will we achieve this? • Increase the City’s use of recycled and recyclable materials • Reduce the City’s waste generation • Improve resource recovery for all waste streams across the City • Support, engage and guide our community to reduce waste generation and divert waste from landfill. How will we measure our progress? • Progress against Western Australia’s Waste Strategy targets • Community satisfaction with the City’s waste collection and recycling services • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs. protects our environment from the impacts of waste The City aims to support a circular economy which reduces consumption and recaptures waste to be reused or recycled. To achieve this, we will provide a comprehensive waste management and recycling service to our community to reduce the impact of waste on our environment. We will also reduce waste generated through our own operations and engage and educate our community to reduce, reuse and recycle.

Associated City services Container Deposit Scheme, Resource Recovery, Waste Operations.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

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Key result area

Our Leadership

A customer-focused City

A capable and efficient City

A well-governed City

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR LEADERSHIP

Objective: Provide accountable and ethical governance Transparent and ethical governance contributes to public trust and confidence in Council decision making, and the City is committed to this process. This practice of good governance will be responsible, clear and in line with legislative requirements to ensure we support the best interests of our community. We will continue to monitor and improve our accountability and integrity and be an active contributor in the local government sector.

A well-governed City

How will we achieve this? • Comply with legislation, standards and obligations • Conscious and effective management of risk • Provide local government sector leadership.

How will we measure our progress? • Annual Compliance Audit Return • Compliance of the City’s operations with the Risk Management Policy • Attainment of awards and recognition within the sector • Operational key performance indicators for each of our associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services Council Governance, Compliance, Risk & Information Management, Executive Services.

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A customer-focused City

Objective: Deliver excellent customer service

The City is committed to communicating and engaging with our community openly and inclusively to ensure they have the opportunity to participate in decision making and help shape our future. We will proactively seek out feedback and genuinely listen to the voices of all people in our community to understand their needs and set priorities. We will also continue to make it easier for our customers to receive services and have access to information online to improve the customer experience at all levels. How will we achieve this? • Provide consistent, responsive and efficient customer service • Involve, engage and inform our community • Transform the City’s digital environment to increase access to the City. How will we measure our progress? • Performance against targets outlined within the City’s Customer Service Charter • Community satisfaction with the way in which the City keeps residents informed • Participation numbers for community engagement programs • Operational key performance indicators for directly associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs. Associated City services All City services.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

OUR LEADERSHIP

Objective: Strive for operational efficiency, effectiveness and continuous improvement The City of Stirling is the largest local government area by population in Western Australia and we are a consistent and strong performer within the sector. Through integrated and robust planning, we will continue to deliver our priorities and manage our resources responsibly to ensure the City’s long-term sustainability. Our capable and engaged employees will encourage future thinking and seek opportunities for improvement and collaboration within our organisation.

A capable and efficient City

How will we achieve this? • Plan for the future, manage resources and measure performance • Provide responsible financial and asset management • Drive improvement and innovation to build capacity and increase efficiency and effectiveness • Maintain a highly skilled and effective workforce.

How will we measure our progress? • Adherence to the legislated Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework • City’s performance against statutory financial management measures • Annual service planning and improvement program is undertaken • Operational key performance indicators for directly associated services • Progress and outcomes of dedicated City projects and programs.

Associated City services All City services.

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Sustainable Stirling 2022–2032

KEY STRATEGIES AND PLANS

Federal and State Government: Key strategies and plans

Federal Government

• National Agreement on Closing the Gap • National Waste Policy • Recycling and Waste Reduction Bill 2020 • Renewable Energy Target, Clean Energy Regulator • Smart Cities Plan, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet • Recycling and Waste Reduction Bill 2020.

State Government

• Active Living for All 2017–2019: A Framework for Physical Activity in Western Australia, Department of Local Government, Sport, and Cultural Industries • Beyond 2020: WA Youth Action Plan 2020–2022, Department of Communities • Directions 2031 and Beyond: Metropolitan Planning Beyond the Horizon, Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage, Western Australian Planning Commission • Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2019–2024, Department of Local Government, Sports and Cultural Industries • Implementing the Principles of Multiculturalism Locally – A Planning Guide for Western Australian Local Governments, Department of Local Government, Sports and Cultural Industries, and Office of Multicultural Interest • Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework and Guidelines, 2016, Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries • Perth and Peel @ 3.5 million March 2018, Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage, Western Australian Planning Commission • SD 6: Strategic Directions for the WA Sport and Recreation Industry 2016–2020, Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries • Small Business Friendly Local Governments Initiative, Small Business Development Corporation • State Government Strategy for Tourism in Western Australia 2020, Department of Jobs, Tourism, Science and Innovation • State Planning Strategy 2050, Planning for Sustained Growth and Prosperity, Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage, Western Australian Planning Commission • State Public Health Plan for Western Australia 2019–2024, Department of Health • Strategic Directions Framework 2015–2030 for Arts and Culture in WA, Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries • Towards Zero, Road Safety Strategy to Reduce Road Trauma in Western Australia 2008–2020, Road Safety Commission • Western Australia Container Deposit Scheme, Department of Water and Environmental Regulation

• WA Housing Strategy 2020–2030, Department of Communities • Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2030.

Industry Associations

• IAP2 Core Values of Public Participation, International Association of Public Participation • Participation Australasia Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap 2019–2029, Council of Australian Governments.

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