City of Stirling Corporate Business Plan

Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025

Contents

Message from the Mayor and the Chief Executive Officer

3

Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework

4

About this Plan

5

Reporting performance

7

Council

8

Organisational structure

9

Our vision

11

Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 at a glance

12

Key result area: Thriving communities

14

Acknowledgement of Country Ngalak kaadatj Nyoongar nedingar wer birdiya, baalap barn boodja-k wer kaaratj boodja-k koora koora wer yeyi. Ngalak kaadatj baalabang malayin wer nakolak baalap yang ngalany-al City of Stirling dandjoo Nyoongar moort-al kolbang koorliny. City of Stirling kaadatj Nyoongar moort Nyoongar boodja-k Wadjak boodja-k, Mooro boodja-k. The City of Stirling acknowledges the Wadjak People of the Nyoongar Nation as the traditional custodians of Mooro Country. We pay our respects to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders past and present for they hold the memories, the traditions, the culture and hopes for Aboriginal Australia. The City is committed to forging stronger relationships and a deeper respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. By acknowledging and respecting the diversity and history of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, we will continue to realise our vision for reconciliation.

Key result area: Vibrant economy

24

Key result area: Liveable neighbourhoods

28

Key result area: Sustainability

36

Key result area: Governance and leadership

42

Informing strategies and plans: Local Planning Strategy

50

Informing strategies and plans: Risk Management Framework

51

Informing strategies and plans: Workforce Plan

52

Informing strategies and plans: Long-Term Financial Plan

53

Informing strategies and plans: Asset Management Framework

54

City of Stirling stakeholders

56

Federal and state government: Key strategies and plans

58

City of Stirling 2021/22 Budget

59

Overview

59

Capital works program

60

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 1

Message from the Mayor and the Chief Executive Officer

The City of Stirling is proud to present the City’s Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025, which details how we plan to deliver the objectives and strategies set in our 10-year Strategic Community Plan 2018 – 2028.

The The City of Stirling is the largest local government by population in Western Australia and is projected to grow further in the coming years. As the community is our priority, we continually strive to meet the changing needs of our residents and plan for this growth. COVID-19 has changed the City’s priorities to focus on our local neighbourhoods. Overwhelmingly, people want to have access to a range of services and facilities within walking distance of their home. In this Corporate Business Plan, the City aims to create vibrancy in our local centres through a range of services and projects to support these unique places to grow and prosper while maintaining our rich history. These include: y Stirling City Centre – Community Infrastructure Plan y Oral history interviews – Stirling Stories y Public art projects y Street signs of significance y Homelessness support.

Over 22,000 businesses operate in the City of Stirling, many of which are small businesses. With well-established business and retail centres, the City of Stirling is the second-largest employment district in Western Australia after the Perth CBD. The City continues to support the business community through a range of services and projects aimed at small businesses, including event sponsorships, shopfront grants and a new Business Innovation Competition in 2021. As always, the City’s financial stability is paramount and critical to ensure that we deliver a high level of service while maintaining our debt-free status. Currently, the City maintains a solid financial position which gives us the ability to fund a range of exciting major projects aligned to the City’s strategic priorities. We will continue to deliver improvements to major community facilities including the Hamersley Public Golf Course, Stirling Leisure Centres – Terry Tyzack Aquatic Centre and Inglewood Oval/Hamer Park.

The Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 provides the approach and a transparent account of how these projects will be delivered. This has been reinforced at the prestigious 2021 Australasian Reporting Awards, with the City of Stirling receiving the Gold Award for the seventh consecutive year for excellence in transparency and reporting for our 2019/20 Annual Report. Along with the Annual Report, the City will report the progress of projects and performance of services to the Council on a quarterly basis. We are committed to continuing to deliver a sustainable and thriving City which engages the community and fosters prosperity. The Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 is an important part of our overall ‘Plan for the Future’ and with hard work and consistent service delivery, the City continues to strengthen its position as a City of choice to live, work and visit.

Stuart Jardine PSM Chief Executive Officer

Mark Irwin Mayor

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 3

Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework

In 2011, the Western Australian State Government introduced legislation requiring local governments to prepare an Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework. The framework requires the development of a ‘Plan for the Future’, comprising a 10-year Strategic Community Plan, a four-year Corporate Business Plan and supporting resource plans. As part of the integrated planning process, local governments are required to consult with their communities to develop a long-term vision; examine the demographic, social, environmental and economic trends shaping the future of their area; and align their activities and resources to address the community’s aspirations expressed in the vision. Under the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework, it is also obligatory for local governments to measure, assess and report their performances every year to their community. The measurement and reporting process facilitates continuous improvement of local governments’ performance and services towards the community’s vision and objectives. The diagram below illustrates the City of Stirling’s Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework.

Informing Strategies

Plans for the future

Measuring performance

Strategic Community Plan (10 year plan) Vision Mission Values and sustainability principles

About this Plan

Community outcomes

Long Term Financial Plan Asset Management Framework Workforce Plan Local Planning Strategy Risk Management Framework

Objectives Strategies

y Lists the services and projects that the City will deliver in 2021 – 2025 y Outlines how the City will measure and report the progress of key projects and services y Provides an overview of the City’s informing strategies such as the Local Planning Strategy, Long-Term Financial Plan, Workforce Plan and Asset Management Plans y Describes the City’s commitment to risk management y Summarises the City’s operational budget and capital works program for the 2021/22 financial year y Provides the City’s 2021/22 budget overview. The City of Stirling’s Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 meets all regulatory requirements. The implementation of the City’s Corporate Business Plan will continue to drive improvements in service delivery and contribute towards achievement of the community’s vision for the City of Stirling to be the ‘City of Choice’.

This Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 (‘the Plan’) has been shaped by the community’s long-term vision and aspirations that have been encapsulated in the Strategic Community Plan 2018 – 2028.

Corporate Business Plan (four year plan) City services City projects and programs

City performance

In addition to feedback received on the Strategic Community Plan, research was undertaken to understand the changing demographics and future socio-economic challenges. Further, strategies and plans from the state and federal governments were reviewed to ensure the City of Stirling is compliant and well prepared for the next 10 years. This Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 has been updated to reflect the changes identified in the City’s integrated planning and budget process. It also details the services and projects the City will deliver over 2021 – 2025 to support achieving them. The Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 outlines projects and services that will be delivered over the next four years and has been directly influenced by the City’s Long-Term Financial,

Asset Management and Workforce Plans. The Corporate Business Plan, in turn, guides the development of the 2021/22 annual budget, service plans and annual project plans. In everything the City does, it will make the very best use of its finite resources to achieve the greatest possible benefit for the community. The Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025: y States the City’s long-term vision, mission and values y Links the strategic objectives listed in the Strategic Community Plan 2018 – 2028, which was reviewed in 2020, with the delivery of services, key projects and programs y Provides an overview of the Council and organisational structure

Annual service plans (one year plan) Operational service, projects and programs activities

Service delivery Project delivery Program delivery

Annual Budget Annual Plans

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 5

Reporting performance

Reporting progress towards the achievement of the objectives in the Corporate Business Plan and the Strategic Community Plan is an integral part of the City’s Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework. The City uses quarterly and annual reports to measure achievement and progress. The City of Stirling has adopted a ‘balanced scorecard’ approach to measure the progress, performance and quality of the planned projects and services that are outlined in the Corporate Business Plan. This balanced scorecard will measure the City’s service performance across four key areas:

Customer Service Indicators will be used to measure customer and community satisfaction through independent surveys and internal analysis of efficiencies when dealing with customer correspondence.

Financial Standard accounting practice indicators such as budget variances will be used to measure the performance

of revenue, operational expenditure and capital expenditure.

Human Resources Indicators will be used to measure employee turnover, occupational safety and health, annual leave planning and individual officer performance appraisals.

Quality Using unique service-specific key performance indicators, services will be measured to reflect the overall quality of each service.

The City of Stirling’s performance in service delivery and progress against project milestones will be reported to the Council and the City’s Executive team each quarter. This will provide greater accountability and transparency and improve efficiency and effectiveness across the organisation. Further detail on the City’s balanced scorecard is outlined in the City of Stirling’s Performance Evaluation Framework.

6

Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 7

Organisational structure

Council

The City of Stirling comprises four directorates: Community Development, Corporate Services, Infrastructure, and Planning & Development.

With over 220,000 residents, the City of Stirling is the largest local government in Western Australia by population. The City is divided into seven wards, each represented by two Elected Members. The City of Stirling has 14 Councillors and a popularly elected Mayor.

Each directorate is led by a director who reports to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Directorates are made up of a number of business units, each overseen by a business unit manager. The CEO also has a business unit under his leadership. The CEO is appointed by and directly accountable to the Council.

Carine

Hamersely

Watermans Bay

Balga

Balga Ward

Hamersley Ward

Mirrabooka

Community and Customers

North Beach

Balcatta

Karrinyup

Westminster

Perth

Trigg

Gwelup

Stirling

Council

Nollamara

Dianella

Coastal Ward

Doubleview

Indian Ocean

Inglewood Ward

Perth

Osborne Ward

Innaloo

Chief Executive Officer

Yokine

Doubleview Ward

Scarborough

Tuart Hill

Lawley Ward

Fremantle

Osborne Park

Joondanna

Woodlands

Inglewood

Coolbinia

Wembley Downs

Glendalough

Menora

Executive Services

Churchlands

Herdsman

Governance

Wembley

Mt Lawley

Community Development

Corporate Services

Planning & Development

Infrastructure

Mayor Mark Irwin

Corporate Information Services

Community Safety

Engineering Services

City Future

Inglewood Ward

Balga Ward

Coastal Ward

Doubleview Ward

Hamersley Ward

Lawley Ward

Osborne Ward

Facilities, Projects & Assets

Community Services

Finance Services

Development Services

Customer & Communications

Human Resources

Parks & Sustainability

Deputy Mayor Bianca Sandri

Cr David Boothman JP

Cr Karen Caddy

Cr Stephanie Proud JP

Cr Chris Hatton

Cr Joe Ferrante

Cr Adam Spagnolo

Recreation & Leisure

Waste & Fleet

Cr David Lagan

Cr Keith Sargent

Cr Felicity Farrelly

Cr Elizabeth Re

Cr Karlo Perkov

Cr Suzanne Migdale

Cr Lisa Thornton

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 9

Our vision The City of Stirling will be a place where people choose to live, work, visit and invest. We will have safe and thriving neighbourhoods with a range of housing, employment and recreational opportunities. We will engage with our diverse community to help shape our future into the City of Stirling – City of Choice.

Our mission To serve the City’s diverse community through delivering efficient, responsive and sustainable services. Our values The City of Stirling’s core values are: • Agile • Approachable • Inclusive • Innovative • Inspiring • Respectful • Transparent.

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 11

Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 at a glance

The Corporate Business Plan outlines the services, projects and programs that the City of Stirling will undertake in 2021 – 2025, under each of the key result areas, and in alignment with the strategic objectives listed in the City’s updated Strategic Community Plan 2018 – 2028.

Liveable neighbourhoods

Sustainability

Governance and leadership

Thriving communities

Vibrant economy

Liveable neighbourhoods

Programs y Building Renewal Program y Citywide Park Asset Refurbishment y Community Parklands Upgrades y Drainage Program y Footpaths Program y Irrigation Program y Other Infrastructure Renewals y Rights of Way Program y Road Renewal Program y Sports Reserves Infrastructure.

Services y City Trees y Container Deposit Scheme y Natural Areas

Services y Compliance, Risk & Information Management

Services y Aged & Disability Care Services y Community Development y Emergency Management y Environmental Health y Family Services y Leisure Services y Libraries & Lifelong Learning y Multicultural Engagement y Parking Services y Ranger Services y Recreation Facilities y Security Services y Youth & Children Development. Projects y Aquatic Safety Improvements y Art Award and Exhibition 2021 y Bond Cottage Renovation y Community Collaboration Fund y Community Safety Body Camera Project y Homelessness Support y Kaleidoscope Initiative y Mount Lawley Retail Precinct CCTV Upgrade y Oral History Interviews – Stirling Stories y Public Art Projects y Sport Floodlighting Control System y Sports and Recreational Facilities Plan y Stirling City Centre – Community Infrastructure Plan y Street Signs of Significance y Western Australia Police Force CCTV Access y Women’s Shed. Programs y Recreational Facilities Equipment Replacement Program.

Services y Arts & Activation y Economic Development.

Services y Asset Management y Building Services y City Future Projects y Construction Services y Design Services y Facility Management y Maintenance Services y Planning Services y Project Management y Property Services

y Council Governance y Customer Experience y Executive Services y Financial Accounting y Financial Planning y Fleet Services

Projects y Business Innovation Competition y Cyber Security Program y Event Sponsorship y Mount Lawley Streetscape Improvements y New City Entry Statements y Place Activation – Shopfront Improvement Grants y Small Business Friendly Approval Project.

y Open Space & Parks Development y Parks, Reserves & Streetscapes y Resource Recovery y Sustainability y Waste Collection. Projects y Coastal Hazard Risk Management and Adaptation Planning y Living Green School Funds y Million Trees Initiative y New Waste Truck y Recycling Centre Balcatta Development y Sustainable Energy Action Plan y Urban Forest Plan Implementation y Waterwise Councils – Community Incentives/Education. Programs y Energy Improvement Program.

y Human Resources Operations y Human Resources Services y Marketing & Communications y Project Management Office & Business Systems y Purchasing, Procurement & Contracts y Rates & Receivables y Strategic & Business Planning y Technology Services y Workplace Health & Safety. Projects y Customer Relationship Management System Implementation y Customer Contact Centre Call Software Upgrade y Upgrade of City of Stirling Templates and e-Newsletter Transition. Programs y CIS Technology Projects and Upgrades y Fleet Replacement Program.

y Schemes, Policies & Heritage y Swimming Pool Inspections y Transport Services y Verge & Crossover Services. Projects y Grindleford Sports Floodlighting Upgrade y Hamersley Golf Course Redevelopment y Herdsman Glendalough Structure Plan y Heritage Awards y Inglewood Oval/Hamer Park Redevelopment y Lighting Condition Audit y Local Planning Scheme No. 4 y Parking Policy Review y Redevelopment of Stirling Leisure Centres – Terry Tyzack Aquatic Centre – Inglewood y Robinson Reserve Master Plan Implementation y Scarborough Beach Redevelopment Area Normalisation y Stephenson Avenue Extension y Stirling City Centre – Osborne Park Precinct Plan y Subdivision Development Works Programs y Trackless Tram Business Case.

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 13

Key result area: Thriving communities

Outcome 1: Inclusive and harmonious City Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Strengthen communities through sense of place Strategy: How will we get there? y Facilitate social participation through engagement and activation of local places y Celebrate and advocate for our multicultural and diverse community y Encourage and promote active participation and volunteering y Enable opportunities for lifelong learning.

Key informing frameworks and plans y Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan y Multicultural Framework y City of Stirling Public Art Masterplan.

Outcome 1: Services Services

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Community Development

y Aboriginal community engagement y Access and inclusion y Age-friendly communities y Community centre management y Community hubs y Homelessness support y Men’s Shed y Volunteer services y Social planning

12.98

$2,765,567

Libraries & Lifelong Learning

y Library and information services y Lifelong learning development programs and projects y Museum and community history services

66.79

$9,301,268

Multicultural Engagement

y Multicultural framework y Settlement Engagement and Transition Support

2.80

$364,875

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 15

Outcome 1: Projects Oral History Interviews – Stirling Stories To conduct seven oral history interviews with senior residents of retirement centres and members of autumn and seniors’ clubs for recording the history of the local areas for future generations

Outcome 1: Projects Art and Award Exhibition 2021

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

 2024/25

Q1 Methodology for Stirling Stories (oral history interviews) finalised Seven sites for the oral history interviews – one for each Ward selected Q2 Oral history interviews in sites 1 to 6 completed Q3 Oral history interview in site 7 completed Q4 Sound recordings of the interviews uploaded to the City’s website

This biennial exhibition is open to Western Australian artists to display their original 2D and 3D works in a public exhibition

Q1 Promotion of Art and Award Exhibition 2021 commenced Artists shortlisted Q2 Art and Award Exhibition 2021 event conducted Entries evaluated Awards announced

Q3 Q4

2021/22 net project cost

$70,000

2021/22 net project cost

$21,000

Bond Cottage Renovation

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Public Art Projects

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

 2024/25

To utilise the historical Bond Cottage as a shop front for Stirling Men’s Shed

Q1 Bond Cottage relocated from the City of Stirling Works Depot to the Men’s Shed at 8 Vasto Place, Balcatta Q2 Site works at 8 Vasto Place, Balcatta completed

To implement the City’s Public Art Masterplan by installing one or more small art works in the public realm across the City

Q1 Project planning and scoping completed Q2 Artist’s brief developed Quotations for art works requested Q3 Quotations received and assessed, and artwork selected Q4 Artwork installation completed

Q3 Bond Cottage restoration commenced Q4 Bond Cottage restoration completed Shop front opened

2021/22 net project cost

$50,000

2021/22 net project cost

$20,000 Partially grant funded

Street Signs of Significance

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Community Collaboration Fund

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

 2024/25

Q1 Selection criteria for local history information signage developed Street names selected Database listing of all streets, roads and laneways within the City of Stirling completed Q2 Research of the selected street names completed Q3 Signages installed Aboriginal street naming history and signages prioritised Q4

To provide historical information on the significance of the person or events after which streets are named Forty local history information signs will be attached to selected existing street name signs

To provide grants to community members, organisations and businesses to build their capacity and enable them to meet the City’s social planning objectives

Q1 Community Collaboration Fund program promoted Applications for grants invited Q2

Q3 Applications received and reviewed Q4 Fund acquittal and report completed

2021/22 net project cost

$50,000

Kaleidoscope Initiative

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

To create partnerships with new migrants and businesses to build a skilled and diverse workforce

Q1 Mentoring cycle 1 (2021/22) commenced

2021/22 net project cost

$20,000

Work-Integrated Learning Program cycle 1 (2021/22) commenced Customer relationship management (CRM) tool developed Q2 Graduation of mentees/Work-Integrated Learning Program Mentoring cycle 2 (2021/22) commenced Toolkit and assessment for inclusive workplaces developed Q3 Report submitted to the Office of Multicultural Interests Work-Integrated Learning Program cycle 2 (2021/22) commenced Graduation of mentees Q4 Graduation of mentees/Work-Integrated Learning Program Work-Integrated Learning Program cycle 3 (2021/22) commenced

2021/22 net project cost

$89,312 Partially grant funded

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 17

Outcome 2: Active and healthy City Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Promote active and healthy lifestyle choices Strategy: How will we get there? y Facilitate and partner for a range of recreation and leisure opportunities for everyone in the City y Facilitate and advocate for the provision of a range of quality health services.

Outcome 2: Projects Aquatic Safety Improvements

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

To implement the recommendations of the Aquatic Safety Audit

Q1 Annual training program developed to improve aquatic safety standards at City of Stirling facilities Session 1 of aquatic safety training delivered Q2 Session 2 of aquatic safety training delivered Session 3 of aquatic safety training delivered Q3 Session 4 of aquatic safety training delivered Q4 Session 5 of aquatic safety training delivered Session 6 of aquatic safety training delivered

Key informing frameworks and plans y Public Open Space Strategy.

2021/22 net project cost

$15,000

Sport Floodlighting Control System

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

 2024/25

To investigate and procure a new sports floodlighting system that enables a more consistent, efficient, and user-friendly approach for the management and use of sports floodlights across the City

Q1 Working group established Q2 Consultancy brief finalised and advertised Consultant engaged Q3 Technical requirements developed Stakeholder engagement completed User requirements developed Q4 Project scope completed Request for quotation advertised

Outcome 2: Services Services

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Environmental Health

y Food safety y Disease control y Premises inspection and licensing of buildings y Environmental protection y Public safety y Health education and promotion y Development control: statutory health compliance y Leisure planning (including stakeholder engagement) y Club development y Beach services

16.65

$2,767,938

2021/22 net project cost $70,000 Stirling City Centre – Community Infrastructure Plan 2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

Leisure Services

19.70

$6,509,853

To undertake a needs assessment for the provision of community infrastructure for the Stirling City Centre

Q1 Project brief developed Q2 Project scope and methodology finalised Needs assessment process commenced

Recreation Facilities

y Hamersley Public Golf Course y Learn to Swim y Leisure and sports programs y Special facility projects y Health and fitness y Facility hire y Aquatics y Customer service

108.16

$6,483,392

Existing infrastructure provision mapped and benchmarking established

Q3 Analysis of existing provision completed Recommendations developed Q4 Draft needs assessment report completed and presented to the Executive team Workshop for Elected Members to review the needs assessment report undertaken

2021/22 net project cost

$100,000

Sports and Recreation Facilities Plan

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

To undertake gap analyses of sports and recreational facilities for the future

Q1 Q2 First local area needs assessment for the financial year 2021/22 completed Q3 Q4 Second local area needs assessment for the financial year 2021/22 completed

2021/22 net project cost

Nil Project cost included within the service cost

Outcome 2: Programs Program

2021/22 net cost

Recreational Facilities Equipment Replacement Program To renew recreational facilities equipment assets at end-of-life

$367,000

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 19

Outcome 3: Accessible services Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Accessible services for all members of the community Strategy: How will we get there? y Ensure residents of all abilities and backgrounds have access to City services y Adapt services to meet the needs of a changing population, particularly aged and youth.

Outcome 3: Projects Homelessness Support

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

To enable the City to connect homeless people to various services to prevent, support and build capacity

Q1 External contractors engaged to undertake outreach work in the City of Stirling Triage process and referrals for services established and promoted Q2 Q3 Services and processes reviewed Data collected Q4 Report prepared to demonstrate need for outreach services

Key informing frameworks and plans y Age-Friendly Strategy y Access and Inclusion Plans y Homelessness Strategy y Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan y Youth Framework.

2021/22 net project cost

$98,000

Women’s Shed

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

To provide opportunities for women to engage in educational and recreational activities by refurbishing a space in the Scarborough Hub

Q1 Works to refurbish the Scarborough Hub for the Women’s Shed commenced Q2 Facility upgrade works completed Schedule for women’s workshop established and promoted Women’s Shed opened

Outcome 3: Services Service

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Aged & Disability Care Services

y Community care services y Community day clubs y Community food services y Community collaborations y Stirling Women’s Centre y Safe at Home y Naala Djookan Healing Centre

64.06

$1,833,115

Q3 Evaluation conducted Q4 Evaluation completed

Report on Women’s Shed finalised

Family Services

13.89

$740,045

2021/22 net project cost

$90,000

Youth & Children Development

y Youth development y Childhood development y Outside school hours care and vacation care

8.37

$851,296

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 21

Outcome 4: Safer City Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Work with the community to create a safer City Strategy: How will we get there? y Support the community and develop partnerships to enhance community safety

Outcome 4: Projects Community Safety Body Camera Project To provide CCTV body cameras to parking, security and ranger field officers

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Q1 Project scope developed

Procurement of CCTV process commenced Q2 CCTV body cameras delivered and installed CCTV body cameras is in use by field officers

Key informing frameworks and plans y City of Stirling Public Parking Implementation Strategy.

Q3 Q4

2021/22 net project cost

$65,000

Mount Lawley Retail Precinct CCTV Upgrade

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

To upgrade the existing CCTV network within the Mount Lawley retail precinct between Astor Lane and Beaucott Lane

Q1 Project work commenced Q2 Procurement process commenced

Delivery and installation of CCTV completed Upgraded CCTV started functioning

Outcome 4: Services Service

Q3 Q4

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Emergency Management

y Emergency management

0.50

$162,997

2021/22 net project cost

$70,000

Western Australia Police Force CCTV Access

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Parking Services

y Parking services

12.15 18.00

$494,758

Ranger Services (previously part of Ranger & Security Services) Security Services (previously part of Ranger & Security Services)

y Ranger services y Animal care facility y Companion animal management

$2,791,493

To provide Western Australian Police with direct remote access to live and historical CCTV at key City of Stirling locations

Q1 Q2 Review of Western Australian Police Force CCTV access trial completed Project scope finalised Q3 Procurement process commenced Q4 CCTV delivery and access for Western Australian Police Force completed

y Neighbourhood patrols y Technical security services

23.00

$221,011

2021/22 net project cost

$50,000

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 23

Key result area: Vibrant economy

Outcome 1: Destination City Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Attract visitors to our City Strategy: How will we get there? y Create vibrant entertainment and visitor precincts y Promote the City’s iconic attractions and events.

Key informing frameworks and plans y Arts and Events Plan y Strategic Approach to Place Activation.

Outcome 1: Services Services

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Arts & Activation

y Arts management y Event management y Place activation y Grants and sponsorship

7.40

$2,981,555

Outcome 1: Projects Event Sponsorship

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

 2024/25

To promote tourism in the City by sponsoring various sporting events

Q1 Q2 Sponsorship provided for the Australian Masters Games Sponsorship provided for the BMX Nationals Q3 Sponsorship provided for the Australian Beach Volleyball Q4 Final report on the economic impact of the sponsored events prepared

2021/22 net project cost

$130,350

Mount Lawley Streetscape Improvements

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

To deliver ‘parklet-style’ upgrade at 679 Beaufort Street

Q1 Q2 Scoping and planning of public realm improvements completed Q3 Parklet-style public space design confirmed Funding availability confirmed Q4 Public realm improvements completed

2021/22 net project cost

$195,000

New City Entry Statements

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

 2024/25

To replace existing entry statements (concrete plinths) located on the 5 main entry roads into wthe City

Q1 Research, planning, and scoping of locations, suppliers and designs completed Q2 Stakeholder engagement of Aboriginal community and other groups completed Q3 Artist brief was developed and information for quotation completed Q4 Design reviewed, assessed and selected

The project will incorporate designs that reflect the City of Stirling’s Aboriginal heritage

2021/22 net project cost

$50,000

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 25

Outcome 2: A great place to work, invest and do business Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Facilitate economic growth

Outcome 2: Projects Cyber Security Program

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

CyberCheck.me is a collaborative initiative with Edith Cowan University to raise awareness and provide education to local businesses on cybercrime

Q1 Q2 Cyber Security workshops planned and promoted Q3 Workshops held Q4 Cyber security program completed Final report received from Edith Cowan University

Strategy: How will we get there? y Promote investment and partnership opportunities y Make it easier to do business with the City y Support and facilitate local small business growth.

Key informing frameworks and plans y Economic and Tourism Development Strategy.

2021/22 net project cost

$25,000

Place Activation – Shopfront Improvement Grants 2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

These grants aim to enhance the destination and visitor experience in the City’s town centres of Mount Lawley, Inglewood, Main Street Osborne Park, Doubleview and Scarborough

Q1 Planning works completed Grant applications opened Q2 Grant applications closed

Grant applications assessed and successful applicants notified Project delivery by grant recipient commenced Q3 Project delivery by grant recipient continued Q4 Grant acquittal, funding and evaluation completed

Outcome 2: Services Services

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Economic Development

y Tourism promotion and event attraction to the City y Local business attraction to enhance economic capacity

3.0

726,870

2021/22 net project cost

$50,000

y Small business support y Advocacy for business

Small Business Friendly Approvals Project

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

The project will improve customer service by streamlining assessment of small business applications within the City

Q1 Improvements to the Property Ci software completed to enable quicker processing of small business applications Q2 Workflow changes made to enable faster assessment of applications Project completed

Outcome 2: Projects Business Innovation Competition

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

To support innovation in local small businesses by running a competition to enable innovative projects to progress

Q1 Expert panel established

Q3 Q4

Application developed for competition

Q2 Competition promoted

2021/22 net project cost

$70,000

Entries for the competition closed

Q3 Q4 Acquittal reports received from business applicants

2021/22 net project cost

$55,000

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Key result area: Liveable neighbourhoods

Outcome 1: Places to live, work and enjoy Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Plan to create unique and liveable neighbourhoods and places that meet community need

Strategy: How will we get there? y Prioritise growth in local activity centres and corridors y Plan for places that reflect their own unique character and heritage, close to services and amenities y Facilitate housing choice for our diverse community y Provide and maintain safe, accessible open spaces for community liveability.

Key informing frameworks and plans y Local Planning Strategy y Local Planning Schemes y Land Use Structure Plans y Heritage Management Strategy.

Outcome 1: Services Services

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Building Services

y Building permits y Demolition permits y Strata inspections y Occupancy permits y Building approvals certificates y Building orders

16.60

$1,541,206

City Future Projects (previously known as Planning Projects)

y Delivery of the City’s Local Planning Strategy and associated sub strategies y Development and management of integrated transport/planning projects y Facilitation of private sector investment y Provision of urban design advice and comments on development y Preparation of funding models, feasibility studies and business cases to support the delivery of transport/planning projects y Strategic land use planning y Street naming and house numbering y Local planning schemes and policies y Processing development proposals in the heritage protection areas and on heritage places y Development application assessment and reporting y Pre-lodgement advice y Design review panel service y Subdivision assessments (for Western Australian Planning Commission) y Local development plan/structure plan assessment and reporting

6.00

$1,214,032

Schemes, Policies & Heritage (previously known

6.10

$1,258,477

as Planning Schemes & Policies)

Planning Services

38.50

$4,320,159

Swimming Pool Inspections

y Inspections of private swimming pools

3.00

$101,972

Verge & Crossover Service

y Management of verge permits and verge/tree bonds y Crossover installation determination y Crossover subsidy determination y Verge treatment installation determinations

7.00

$1,117,545

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Outcome 2: Accessible and connected City Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Connect the community through sustainable and integrated transport networks

Outcome 1: Projects Herdsman Glendalough Structure Plan To complete the Structure Plan in line with regulation changes, finalise developer contribution plans and review funding options for infrastructure

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Q1 Amendment 114 and Structure Plan submitted to the Western Australian Planning Commission and the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage for consideration Q2 Q3 Modifications to the Structure Plan commenced Modifications to Amendment 114 commenced Q4 Amendment 114 adopted by the Western Australian Planning Commission Structure Plan adopted by the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage

Strategy: How will we get there? y Provide and maintain safe, accessible roads, parking, cycleways and pathways y Advocate for improved public transport options to enhance activity and reduce reliance on vehicle use.

Key informing frameworks and plans y Integrated Transport Strategy y Integrated Cycling Strategy y Rights of Way Management Strategy y Transport Asset Management Plan.

2021/22 net project cost

$10,000

Heritage Awards

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

 2024/25

A biennial Heritage Awards ceremony to celebrate and incentivise management of the City’s heritage buildings by the community

Q1 Nomination period for the Heritage Awards opened Q2 Nomination period closed Q3 Assessment of nominations completed Q4 2022 History and Heritage Awards event held

Outcome 2: Services Services

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

Construction Services

y Construction – roads, drainage, bus shelters, lighting, pathways etc y Surveys – cadastral

34.00

$1,249,805

2021/22 net project cost

$20,000

Local Planning Scheme No. 4

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Design Services

y Road design y Rights of Way design y Traffic management design y Drainage design

11.50

$181,906

To prepare a new Local Planning Scheme No. 4 and an associated policy manual to meet the City’s statutory obligations under the Planning & Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 and the City’s Local Planning Strategy

Q1 Q2 Approval by Council for advertising the Local Planning Scheme No. 4 received Q3 Approval by the Western Australian Planning Commission to advertise the Local Planning Scheme No. 4 received Q4 Local Planning Scheme No. 4 advertised

y Subdivision and development control y On-street and off-street parking design

Transport Services y Traffic and transport planning y Road safety y Paths – footpaths and cycleways y Street lighting y Underground power y Cycle networks y Bus shelters

7.60

$7,284,856

2021/22 net project cost $120,000 Stirling City Centre – Osborne Park Precinct Plan 2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

To deliver a local development plan that will identify built form guidelines, new road connections and sites for a primary school and public open spaces

Q1 Brief prepared

Consultant appointed Q2 Landowner vision workshop held Q3 Stakeholder workshop held Q4 Landowner design workshop held

2021/22 net project cost

$80,000

Scarborough Beach Redevelopment Area Normalisation This initiative will facilitate the handover of planning control of the Scarborough Beach Redevelopment area to the City, including amendments to Local Planning Scheme No. 3

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

Q1 Q2 Development Contribution Plan (Scheme amendment required) report presented to the Council for approval Q3 Development Contribution Plan advertised Future planning framework for Scarborough Redevelopment Area presented to Council for approval Q4 Report on the outcome of the advertising of the Development Contribution Plan presented to Council

2021/22 net project cost

$25,000

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 31

Outcome 3: Built infrastructure that meets community needs Objective:What does the City aim to achieve? Ensure our assets meet future community needs

Outcome 2: Projects Parking Policy Review

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

To survey parking needs in local and neighbourhood centres

Q1 Consultants appointed to undertake parking surveys Q2 Surveys undertaken Q3 Report submitted by the consultant Q4 Amended Parking Policy presented to Council for endorsement

Strategy: How will we get there? y Provide quality, well-maintained facilities, roads and open spaces for the benefit of the community.

Key informing frameworks and plans y City of Stirling Asset Management Strategy y Property Strategy.

2021/22 net project cost

Nil

Fully reserve funded

Stephenson Avenue Extension

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

Design and construction of the extension of Stephenson Avenue

Q1 Drainage works completed Q2 Practical completion of Phase 1 achieved

Q3 Q4

2021/22 net project cost

Nil Fully grant funded

Outcome 3: Services Services

Trackless Tram Business Case

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Sub-services

FTE

2021/22 net service cost

The business case will be developed to identify planning and funding options required to implement a trackless tram from Glendalough Rail Station to the Scarborough beach

Q1 Consultant engaged to develop the business case for trackless tram Feasibly and scope definition completed

Asset Management

y Asset management planning y Asset management information y Infrastructure asset valuation

8.00

$1,380,519

Q2 Problem and opportunity identified Q3 Options assessment completed Q4 Business case completed

Facility Management Maintenance Services

y Facility management y Building services

15.00

$10,497,271

y Maintenance y Road reserve private works (compliance) y Roadworks traffic management

53.20

$41,645,497

2021/22 net project cost

Nil Fully grant funded

Outcome 2: Programs Program

Project Management

y Major projects y Building projects

12.00

$690,354

2021/22 net cost

Property Services

y Property management y Property analysis and strategy

6.00

$233,810

Footpaths Program Extension and upgrade of the local footpath network Renewal of existing park path assets at the end of their economic life Rights of Way Program Upgrade Rights of Way that have potential for use as public gazette roads

$1,563,000 Partially grant funded

$2,832,000 Partially grant funded $6,121,657 Partially grant funded $1,603,000 Partially grant funded

Road Renewal Program Road resurfacing and road upgrades

Other Infrastructure Renewals Traffic management upgrades, road safety and ‘black spot’ improvements, parking improvements, street lighting upgrades and bus shelters

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 33

Outcome 3: Projects Grindleford Sports Floodlighting Upgrade To install 100 Lux LED sports floodlighting to the north and south fields of Grindleford Reserve

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Q1 Contractor appointed Q2 Works on site commenced Q3 Works completed Q4

2021/22 net project cost

Nil Fully grant funded

Hamersley Golf Course Redevelopment

2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

2024/25

To redevelop the Hamersley Public Golf Course Pavilion into a modern facility that will provide a wide range of golf activities and the development of a 2-level automated driving range

Q1 Detail design completed Q2 Tender documentation completed Q3 Contractor endorsed by Council Q4 Construction commenced

2021/22 net project cost

$1,500,000

Inglewood Oval and Hamer Park Redevelopment

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

This project will include refurbishment and redevelopment of Moyle Pavilion and construction of new Hamer Park clubrooms

Q1 Demolition, slabs and steelwork construction completed for Moyle Pavilion and Hamer Park clubrooms Q2 Practical completion of the Moyle Pavilion and the Hamer Park clubrooms achieved Q3 Demolition of existing Hamer Park clubrooms completed Q4

2021/22 net project cost

$1,377,827

Partially grant funded

Lighting Condition Audit

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

External assessment of City’s 3,000 lighting assets Q1 Lighting register updated

Q2 Request for quotation for lighting audit completed Q3 Contractor appointed Q4 Lighting audit report finalised

2021/22 net project cost

$80,000

Redevelopment of Stirling Leisure Centres – Terry Tyzack Aquatic Centre – Inglewood To redevelop and upgrade an ageing facility to meet the current and future needs of the community

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Q1 Tender advertised Q2 Evaluation of tender submissions completed Q3 Contract awarded Q4 Construction commenced

Outcome 3: Programs Program

2021/22 net cost

2021/22 net project cost

$3,500,000

Building Renewal Program To renew building assets at end-of-life

$410,000 Partially grant funded

Robinson Reserve Master Plan Implementation

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

Citywide Park Asset Refurbishment Renewal of existing park assets at the end of their economic life. Park assets include playgrounds, barbecues, seating, drink fountains, fencing, concrete paths, park signs, etc Community Parklands Upgrades Improvements to community parklands to ensure public open space is attractive and functional for the surrounding communities Drainage Program Upgrade of drainage systems to accommodate stormwater runoff Irrigation Program Renewal of existing park irrigation systems at the end of their economic life Sports Reserve Infrastructure Renewal of existing sports reserve infrastructure assets at the end of their economic life

$2,118,000

To replace existing clubroom and change room buildings to comply with the latest building standards and meet the current and future needs of the clubs

Q1 Design and construct contract – tender advertised Q2 Contractor approved by Council Q3 Demolition of existing building completed Pre-fabrication works commenced Q4 Installation of modular buildings commenced

$895,000

2021/22 net project cost

$1,287,000

$3,985,000

Subdivision Development Works

2021/22

 2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

This project includes subdivision of the City’s landholdings in Scarborough (Bazar Terrace), Westminster (Edale Way) and Yokine (Virgil Avenue) into individual residential lots for disposal

Q1 Subdivision works specifications and documentation completed Q2 Request for quotation advertised and contractor appointed Q3 Works on site completed Q4

$1,640,000

$648,600 Partially grant funded

2021/22 net project cost

Nil Fully reserve funded

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Corporate Business Plan 2021 – 2025 | 35

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